2019 Awards Winners

The annual presentation of The Concrete Society's coveted Awards for Excellence in Concrete took place at The Royal Lancaster London on the 20th November 2019.

Please click here to view all of this years’ shortlisted entries.

Please click here to view the guest list.


Guest presenter and star of Strictly Come Dancing Anton Du Beke, said the project was a worthy winner for its, “high quality, showing many different executions and appearance that can be achieved with concrete.”

Concrete Society 2019 Awards Trophies

OUTRIGHT WINNER

Hackney Wick Station Redevelopment, London

New lifts, stairs and ticketing facilities – plus a 2000-tonne reinforced concrete portal underpass cast-in-situ and moved into position – connects neighbourhoods. In-situ concrete is the primary visual finish; cast-in depictions of chemical symbols create a frieze, excellent board-marked stairs span off full-height as-struck plain walls and polished exposed-aggregate walkways contrast with the ‘grey’ concrete ticket hall.

Judges' Comments:

An overtly concrete structure that brings together functional civil engineering aspect as well as finesse from exceptionally well-formed visual surfaces. On each side of the track, access to the platforms from ground level has been provided by two flights of 10m-long concrete stairs. These stairs spanning off full height as-struck well-detailed smooth side walls have an external face and soffit of excellent board-marked concrete.

Outside there is a fluted wall depicting the type of sheet piling used in the area, which is mirrored through glass panels dividing the train users to the general public access under the tracks.

The new entrance and ticket hall is again all concrete as it was considered to have as few as possible changes in materials.

High-quality polished exposed aggregate forms the pedestrian walkways and the stair risers and tread reflecting the locality of the nearby rivers. This is in contrast to the ‘grey’ concrete ticket hall.

The architect wanted any minor finishing improvements to be left alone as a reflection of the natural materials and the surrounding area.

Overall the output is high quality, showing many different executions and appearance that can be achieved with concrete.

Hackney Wick Station Redevelopment, London

Hackney Wick Station Redevelopment, London

Hackney Wick Station Redevelopment, London

 

HIGHLY COMMENDED

Sevenoaks School, Science and Technology & Global Study Centre, Kent

This state-of-the-art centre highlights the versatility of concrete as an integral part of the structural, architectural and MEP strategy. A stand-out feature is the expressive structure’s ribbed precast concrete roof panels – facilitating slender 7m-wide pitched spans, integrating services and providing thermal mass.

Judges' Comments:

The building appeared to be functioning very well; the noise attenuation was certainly effective and the natural ventilation provided a comfortable environment.

There is a bright and cheerful external façade. The handmade bricks blend in well with the adjacent building and the playground area.

Thermal mass and the visually exposed finish are exploited throughout. The water-tightness of the concrete was important for the basement. Large spans led to column-free spaces allowing for future flexibility.

The finish to the concrete is excellent and this building would be ideal to demonstrate the finishes that can be achieved with both in-situ and precast concrete. Board layout for the soffits resulted in a pleasing pattern, as did the tie-bolt layout for the walls. Precast plugs for the tie-bolt holes were used to great effect. The precast ribbed roof structure providing thermal mass to the upper floor is a standout innovative feature.

Sevenoaks School, Science and Technology & Global Study Centre, Kent

Sevenoaks School, Science and Technology & Global Study Centre, Kent

Sevenoaks School, Science and Technology & Global Study Centre, Kent

 

Hawley Wharf, London

A mixed-use development with eight buildings in a compact site restrained by two rail viaducts, canal and two underground spurs. Concrete is omnipresent, forming the structure and, where exposed, creates a highly expressive finish. Adjacent precast and in-situ elements match well. Polished exposed-aggregate slabs provide visual as well as practical surfaces.

Judges' Comments:

This is a much-needed redevelopment of a run-down area.

As a whole, the development creates free flow access for residents, the four-storey market, passers-by as well as open spaces for events. The mixture of materials fits well with the surrounds and maintains the community environment essential to this canal side inner city location. A variety of shapes were needed to fit the awkward plan configuration. The retention of brick façades and refurbishment of the railway arches maintained a connection to its previous use. This is a unique scheme.

Wherever the concrete is exposed, the finish and detailing is considered to be of the highest quality, both for precast, in-situ work and floor polishing.

Attention to detail is evident throughout the development.

Hawley Wharf, London

Hawley Wharf, London

Hawley Wharf, London

 

Claridge’s Hotel – New Basement, London

This five-storey mega basement was built directly below the existing nine-storey Grade II listed hotel, which remained open throughout construction. Working below the 80-year-old reinforced concrete raft foundation, 62 new RC columns were cast within 1800mm-diameter shafts, which were hand dug by miners. The floors were then installed by top-down construction.

Judges' Comments:

Working below the 80-year-old concrete raft foundation, 62 shafts were hand dug by miners to a depth of 30m. Each was enlarged and lined with precast segments to enable 600mm-diameter self-compacting concrete columns to be cast within each shaft. After installing a perimeter of secant piles, the basement slabs were cast using top-down construction.

All the work: excavation; equipment; supplies; permanent and temporary formwork; and all materials, had to be brought in through a tiny window at the rear of the hotel to ensure zero disturbance to hotel guests. In order for the new leisure facilities in the basement to be accessed from both wings of the hotel, shafts and walkway tunnels were also constructed.

Although not an initial requirement, the finish to the self-compacting concrete is to such a high level that it only required painting to bring it to an acceptable working appearance. This is a unique project not undertaken anywhere before, with many firsts in design and buildability under very restricted constraints, which was made possible by the flexibility of concrete.

Claridge’s Hotel – New Basement, London

Claridge’s Hotel – New Basement, London

Claridge’s Hotel – New Basement, London

 

UCL Student Centre, London

This four-storey and two-basement student hub is a hybrid of precast and in-situ concrete. Externally, white acid-etched precast elevations feature extensively. Internally, exposed concrete is prominent throughout, contributing to the building’s low-energy, low-carbon strategy and thermal stability. The quality of both precast and in-situ concrete is exceptional, with clean, precise detailing.

Judges' Comments:

This four-storey plus two basement levels building admirably fulfils its brief as a student hub, catering for 1000 study spaces, specifically designed for 24/7 occupancy and future flexibility.

The traditional brickwork and the brick-clad panels on the main east elevation harmonise with the existing streetscape providing contrast with the contemporary elements.

Exposed concrete is prominent throughout the building providing thermal massing. Brick-faced cladding panels have also been used to good effect. Load-bearing precast insulated sandwich panels were used at party wall locations.

The bespoke ‘hybrid’ use of precast and in-situ is innovative, as is the ‘supercharged’ thermal massing to cater for 27/7 occupancy. The quality of both precast and in-situ concrete exposed floors and walls is exceptional with clean, precise detailing. Acoustic insulation panels help to provide a quiet and studious working environment.

UCL Student Centre, London

UCL Student Centre, London

UCL Student Centre, London

 

The Royal College of Pathologists, London

The exposed concrete frame with large spans and few columns provides an openplan flexibility to accommodate educational space, break-out areas and meeting rooms. Light-coloured polished concrete floors and board-marked concrete walls are complemented by timber panelling and masonry. Environmentally, the concrete’s thermal mass and coffered slabs form part of the passive cooling strategy.

Judges' Comments:

Attention to the detail is the hallmark of this exceptionally well-constructed project.

The placement of single core provides a column-free floor (13m span). Internally its modern open-plan features exposed concrete with a mix of brick, steel and timber panelling.

The concrete walls are standard finish board-marked and they line up with the mortar line of brick face on each level seen. The polished concrete floor at ground level is light in colour and off-sets well with grey concrete walls and a clean crisp interface has been achieved. The concrete’s board-marked finish is excellent with a couple of ‘as-built’ quirks but that adds to the nature. The way the board-marks lines up with the brick render walls is fantastic, even the mortar between the bricks is consistent and matches the concrete colour. The polished concrete is well executed; impressive how they managed to provide a finish with no variation that butts up to the board-marked concrete skirting. Attention to the detail of panel joints, bolt-hole location and finishing, recesses and fittings.

The Royal College of Pathologists, London

The Royal College of Pathologists, London

The Royal College of Pathologists, London

 

JUDGING PANEL

Principal Judges


Professor Don McQuillan, Vice president Institution of Structural Engineers
Professor Tim Broyd, Past president Institution of Civil Engineers
Deiniol Williams, President, The Concrete Society

Concrete Society Judges


Kathy Calverley, Managing Director, The Concrete Society
Richard Day, Head of Technical Services, The Concrete Society
Neil Crook, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Ian Heritage, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Richard Barnes, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Ian Evans, Engineer, The Concrete Society

 

SPONSORS

 

SUPPORTING INDUSTRY AWARDS

 

The Concrete Repair Association


Award Winner: M5 Oldbury Viaduct, Concrete Repairs Ltd & VolkerLaser

For the collaborative repair works undertaken to the M5 Oldbury Viaduct. The works included repairs to the concrete decks, deck ends and cross-head beams as the waterproofing system and expansion joints on the motorway deck had degraded causing extensive deterioration of the concrete elements. This project required a high level of site management, human and mechanical resource.

The Concrete Repair Association

MPA BRMCA


Excellence in Customer Service Award Winner: Accolade Wind Turbine base, Bristol, CEMEX

An innovative C40/50 concrete including fibres and admixtures to achieve an S5 slump for a wind turbine base cast entirely above ground within a busy 24 hour a day wine processing plant. The wine processing plant remained fully functional with minimum disruption throughout the day to the satisfaction of the contractor Knights Brown and their client Clean Earth Energy and Accolade Wines.

BRMCA

MPA British Precast


Creativity in Concrete Award Winner: Bennetts Associates

Bennetts Associates have a creative approach to architecture, with sustainability at the core of the process. Their work shows a great understanding of concrete’s potential, in particular the use of thermal mass, the use of which is supported by the practice’s own research

British Precast Federation