2018 Awards Winners

The annual presentation of The Concrete Society's coveted Awards for Excellence in Concrete took place at the he Royal Lancaster London.

This year's event is scheduled for Wednesday 20th November 2019 at The Royal Lancaster London, if you want to be part of the Awards' experience please contact Sue Courtney either by email or 01276 607170.

Please click here to view all of these years’ shortlisted entries.

Please click here to view the guest list.

OUTRIGHT WINNER

Mersey Gateway Bridge, Widnes–Runcorn, Cheshire

MGB is unique in being the UK’s only long-span cable-supported bridge constructed primarily using in-situ concrete, thus representing a significant advancement in the material’s application for this purpose. Innovative construction methods, such as the mobile scaffold system, enabled the bridge to be constructed on time and within budget.

Judges' Comments:

The range of concretes produced here had to perform to very tight tolerances and varying strengths. The challenge of consistently delivering and placing 117,000m3 of concrete, over a 29-month, 24/7 construction period in the main bridge was successfully met using two batching plants, one at each side of the river, and by using hot and cold water and insulated formwork as required. GGBS has been used extensively; rapid strength was less of an issue and by using concrete, future maintenance has been minimised.
There is very good execution and consistent finish throughout, aided by the use of CEM I in many strength-critical locations.
The bridge is unique in the UK – it is the first of its type to be constructed using in-situ concrete facilitated by the innovative use of the MSS and other travelling forms. In spite of full in-situ working, the safety record was exemplary.
Flood-lit at night, the three-pylon bridge is iconic, elegant, slender and in full harmony with the Mersey estuary. Its contemporary design provides plenty of modern concrete on view for motorists crossing. This structure represents a significant advancement in the concrete’s application for bridge construction. It works as a big bridge should.

Mersey Gateway Bridge, Widnes–Runcorn, Cheshire

Mersey Gateway Bridge, Widnes–Runcorn, Cheshire

Mersey Gateway Bridge, Widnes–Runcorn, Cheshire

 

HIGHLY COMMENDED

George Green Library, University of Nottingham

This project modernises and extends the existing 1960s library to 21st century standards. A complete refurbishment and overhaul of the existing building and a new curved extension increases the total usable space. The new façade ‘wraps’ around both structures, creating a unifying aesthetic.

Judges' Comments:

Not just a refurbishment but a reinvigoration of a tired 1960s concrete structure with a multi-curved concrete extension that functions excellently for its intended purpose. The extension does not intend to mimic the existing structure but has created an adaptable well-used learning environment lacking in the original. The simplicity of the refurbishment and extension belies the complexity of the design and execution. An excellent example of reinvigoration.
The original concrete fin examination and removal or encapsulation was impressive in its practicality and expertise. A good degree of concrete deterioration expertise was shown in assessing the old structure and incorporating structurally in the new extension.
A large degree of curved surfaces and coffers in the extension was impressive and required craftsmanship in formwork construction. Lowering the basement while supporting the structure and extending the columns was problematic but has resulted in a useful floor space – very well thought out and executed.

George Green Library, University of Nottingham

George Green Library, University of Nottingham

George Green Library, University of Nottingham

 

Plot A – 2 Television Centre, London

Comprising 25,000m2 of post-tensioned slab, precast columns and bespoke architectural finishes, this ten-storey commercial block, above a private members’ club, cinema rooms, roof terrace and swimming pool, is visually impressive. The exposed precast splay columns, prestressed walkways and in-situ soffit are well detailed, the exposed in-situ concrete board-marked core being a standout feature.

Judges' Comments:

Concrete is in the form of in-situ walls, precast columns and PT slabs and has been used to produce the required architectural and structural finishes. Attention to detail is apparent, producing an excellent overall appearance, one of the best in-situ finishes seen in years.
Visually, the ten-storey-high in-situ board-marked finish to one side of the atrium is the stand-out feature of this development, which will certainly show the public what can be achieved with concrete.
The light natural concrete colour has been used to give contrast to the darker floor upstands and the balustrades to the criss-cross walkway bridges across the atrium. The ability to form different shapes in three different forms of concrete at different strengths to meet the engineer’s design requirements shows its versatility. Services are contained within the false floors and the strips of board covering the soffits. This allowed strips of the as-cast soffit concrete to be exposed, giving a good visual contrast.

Plot A – 2 Television Centre, London

Plot A – 2 Television Centre, London

Plot A – 2 Television Centre, London

 

Principal Tower, London

This 50-storey residential building is one of the tallest in London. The innovative jump-form system enabled the construction of all walls and columns as one, in an efficient and safe environment. The finishes were of good quality off durable polypropylene aluminium composite panels. Fibre-optic monitoring was used for the first time, providing valuable information for studying axial shortening effects.

Judges' Comments:

This concrete frame building maximises the development potential of the plot and the visual appearance and harmony of the structure is in keeping with its surroundings.
For each concrete grade, mixes were developed for different weather conditions in order to achieve early strength and progress the post-tensioning and jumpform operations. A range of concrete strength classes was used throughout; post-tensioning was used for all slabs, which allowed for a reduction in slab thickness and load on the foundations.
A good surface finish was achieved in both the top-down basement soffits. The as-built structure was well within tolerances both vertically and horizontally.
The jumpform system offered an innovative method of constructing high-rise concrete-frame buildings in the UK, reducing the six-day cycle per storey to five days. The project also used monitoring for axial shortening of the concrete structure using a fibre-optic system developed by Cambridge University. A complex process, advancing construction in concrete.

Principal Tower, London

Principal Tower, London

Principal Tower, London

 

Two St Peter’s Square, Manchester

Two St Peter’s Square’s façade of polished reconstituted concrete achieves a timeless elegance appropriate to the building’s historic and civic location among listed buildings. Design complexity and innovative installation methods demonstrate technical excellence and expand concrete’s artistic relevance, achieving intricate tracery panels, delicate mega panels and elegant columns at scale.

Judges' Comments:

Visual appearance was a key driver in a very sensitive historic area of the city. The building does not look out of place at all, despite the time differences in construction.
The decorative façades are very special and could only be done in precast concrete or an army of stone masons. Materials are standard but the complexity and quality of the finish is exceptional. The difficulty in forming these complex and varied units should not be underestimated. They are true three-dimensional concrete sculptures used as office window façades.
External column cladding was complex, multiply curved and feels appropriate for the location. The complexity, level of overall detail and quality is excellent. The joints of the units were lined up to show geometrical symmetry from vertical face to horizontal soffit.
The judges were very impressed by this project. The decorative façades are superb and it would not be surprising if this level of decorative façade became more popular.

Two St Peter’s Square, Manchester

Two St Peter’s Square, Manchester

Two St Peter’s Square, Manchester

 

White Collar Factory, London

This most iconic concrete structure resembles a section of Scottish rock cliff and a ship by the river bank. The key challenges include special concrete mix designs, complex building geometry and accuracy in setting out, temporary work design and logistics in construction. The demanding curves and overhanging walls of varying thickness could only have been created in concrete.

Judges' Comments:

The exterior of the office building fits with location. The courtyard gives the feeling of space from within the site boundary, allows thoroughfare for the general public and provides more wellbeing than other office buildings of previous decades. High floor-to-soffit heights help maintain the feeling of space.
The perimeter walls were an in-situ sandwich type construction; cast outer wall, apply insulation, cast inner wall. The reinforced concrete slabs span up to 12m, aided by just five internal columns. These rely on connectivity into the central core with 3m edge cantilevers to balance deflections.
The extent and consistence of the board-marked finish is impressive. The plain-finished soffits were cast of single boarded forms, the finish being better than expected with precise panel layout, minimal board joint steps, discoloration or rust marks. If The Society was discussing/advising on concrete finish to enquirers it would be suggested as a possible benchmark.

White Collar Factory, London

White Collar Factory, London

White Collar Factory, London

 

CERTIFICATE OF RECOGNITION

 

Southbank Centre, London

As recognition of the significance of the Southbank Centre, for both the endurance of its original concrete, which required little or no renovation work after standing magnificently for half a century, and for standing for fifty years as an icon to excellence in concrete construction, The Society presented a Certificate of Recognition to Mark Rushworth from the Southbank Centre, which was also a runner-up at the first Society Awards in 1968.

Southbank Centre, London

Southbank Centre, London

 

JUDGING PANEL

Principal Judges


Professor Don McQuillan, Vice president Institution of Structural Engineers
Professor Tim Broyd, Past president Institution of Civil Engineers

Concrete Society Judges


Kathy Calverley, Managing Director, The Concrete Society
Richard Day, Head of Technical Services, The Concrete Society
Neil Crook, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Ian Heritage, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Richard Barnes, Senior Advisory Engineer, The Concrete Society
Ian Evans, Engineer, The Concrete Society

 

SPONSORS

 

SUPPORTING INDUSTRY AWARDS

 

The Structural Concrete Alliance


Repair & Refurbishment Award Winner: Volkerlaser, 12 Quay, King George Docks, Hull

The repair and strengthening works involved the use of concrete repair, sprayed concrete, cathodic protection and Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) strengthening, to provide a unique solution. Access to the quay was restricted by various factors, including; weather conditions, port activity, tide times and most importantly water levels.

Structural Concrete Alliance

MPA BRMCA


Excellence in Customer Service Award Winner: CEMEX, Northern Line Extension

The British Ready-Mixed Concrete Association Award for Excellence in Customer Service is presented in recognition of the exceptional efforts of a ready-mixed concrete producer in anticipating and fulfilling their customer’s needs. The judging panel considered each entry in terms of the difficulties overcome, quality of service and client satisfaction.

BRMCA

MPA British Precast


Creativity in Concrete Award Winner: Robert Bray

In recognition of a body of work combining SuDs with hard landscape. Projects include: Australia Road, London; Parkside Civic Centre, Bromsgrove; St George’s Primary School, Kidderminster and Bewdley School, Worcestershire.

British Precast Federation